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in science ever took it seriously. heresy number four, the concept of randomness is a mistake. there is far less randomness in this universe than today's science believes and far less randomness than you and i often think. this is not a six monkeys pecking out the works of shakespeare universe. far from it. and heresy number five, information theory -- the hot new theory of the last few years -- is not really about information. not at all. its equations cover only a tiny sliver of what the theory claims. the real core of information is what information theory's founder claude shannon called, quote, meaning, unquote. and meaning, believe it or not, is not covered in information theory. why is that a big mistake? because meaning is central to the cosmos. central to quirks, protons, foe tons, flax ris, stars, lobsters, puppies, bees and human beings. why bother with five heresies? because the cosmos herself is the real heretic. the real breaker of the manmade rules of reason. and thanks to her heretical bent, this we call or car -- peculiar rule-breaking cosmos that you and i have been watchin
say well, maybe there's a problem with arrogance and science needs to be addressed. we would have better science and better scientists, and a better society if we could deal with that your and what are the structural reasons for it, and how might we mitigate that? that would be my question. i think some of that has already been addressed as a competitive nature. but the other would i want to throughout his height. -- hype. i think the human genome project is a wonderful example of something that was very important and very much overhyped. so we see that all the time. so that would be my challenge. sins are bad, and we all have them, and how do we mitigate them is what my question would be. >> i love the idea of a arrogance mitigation project. we can discuss how that might look on the ground, but, you know, as you are speaking, such -- given what stuart writes about certainty and uncertainty and ignorance in his book, and, i think taking it back to the hubris aspect, one of the deepest manifestations of arrogance is in the life statements of certainty, that something is exactly thi
annual conference on science, policy, and the environment, disasters in the environment. i'm the executive director of a national council of the science of the environment, and it is my distinct master of ceremonies for much of the conference. thank you for coming. lots of people are still outside, encourage them to come in and settle themselves down. super storm sandy, drought on agriculture, wildfires, the earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear reactor accident in japan last year, haiti earthquake, the list is long and worrying. in 20 # 11, we had more disasters in the united states costing more than a billion dollars than ever. in fact, we had more expensive disasters, but not quite as many in 2012. the drought and the super storm were hugely, hugely expensive. disasters are happening with greater frequency, greater severity, and absolutely with many, many greater costs. we ray -- we are here over the next three days to work across traditional boundaries to connect scientists of all stripes with practitioners, with policymakers from the international to the local level with co
to the science, an extreme weather event, including hurricane sandy defend stating drought, should inspire us all to think about how we do this job better. providing relief to devastated families and communities is of course the first action. i support it. it should be national priority and i support hr152 as well as the rogers amendment. but we cannot afford to continue the status quo. we need to assure that the investment is done wisely and that it minimizes exposure in the future. first, we need to invest in mitigation. investing a dollar in mitigation can save five dollars in long-term expenses. we need to change the way we budget for disasters. massive storms are no longer unforeseen. we got to get out of the mindset where we toss in a billion dollars in the appropriations committee because it's cheaper for the appropriations committee to fund billions of dollars of unforeseen expenses after the fact, than a few hundred million dollars to prevent those disasters in the long run. and finally, could i not agree more with the testimony that i heard, sitting here, that we need to make sure we're
co-author who is professor of political science at harvard. many years ago when we repose at princeton university, we co-taught a course at the public policy and that led to his co-authored several books on deliberation and democracy. >> host: in the spirit of compromise, you get to vegetative examples. 1986 tax reform health care act. if you work, walk us through this. >> guest: this is a tale of two compromises and begins with ronald reagan presidency, where tax reform was a hugely important issue and hugely difficult issue to get done between republicans and democrats. those of us who lived through the reagan era's recognize that people thought they were very polarized. tip o'neill was a staunch liberal democrat. ronald reagan's staunch republican. yes, they crafted a bipartisan compromise with bradley dan rostenkowski bob packwood being part of the movers of this compromise. password to the affordable care act. it is arguably even more difficult to craft a compromise within one party, the democratic party because of the permanent campaign and how not just polarized, bu
akin. [laughter] a member of the house committee on science, space and technology. it's true. he's the kind of science committee. then there was the theory that romney was a very good candidate , didn't say things people understood, didn't connect with people very well and was somewhat awkward. for instance, when he went to michigan, his home state for that primary and said the trees for the raid had been michigan. the actual quote was i love this state. it seems right here. the trees at the right height. away from here i find no trees to please. no trees at such a perfect height as these. for me i cannot ever be at ease to grow one's knees. or two tall trees that splinter group wisconsin sure has bragging rights on cheese and colorado is where they take your skis. connecticut of course has lyme disease. [laughter] and none of these semi-prepared to say is currently here with the perfect perfect height of trees. [applause] and according to that theory, romney just was in a very good candidate. they should have nominated somebody else. and there is also a theory they were demograp
. the area is also subject to what we in science call multiple stressors. sometimes they are multiple insult as well. again, these red light con influence -- con influence of how how many and natural processes ongoing. there are a couple of highlight national problems in louisiana including the low ox yen area shawf show. sometimes called the dead zone. the high land rates in the area. the con influence of the oil and gas industry with the social structure that also depends on the living resources of fisheries. a lot of natural dynamic, the delta plain is continually changing and wants to change all the time even if people don't want it to change. local areas subject to sea level rise. substantiative of the coast, and of course, seems like always hurricanes that impact our coastal system so dramatically. the other issue is long-term sub -- it's a some thing will change no matter what we try to do. there are going to be many issues facing us as we go in to restoration of the area with funds from the restore act and the ideas that this should be based on the knowledge that we have accrued over
and the rest of the world. we can only build on science. you have to work with government supporters business, parliamentarians, with any stakeholder that understands and is willing to engage in education and managing risk for the future. the first product to the first idea that people that got together in the early parts of the decade serenade instrument for international cooperation. that is key here. they started working on what became the framework for action. i hope at least 10% of you have heard about this. maybe. i'm used to it not being very familiar, but i'm also very used to that people now ascendant when we start describing it. the framework for action was sick to duration of the previous details. there have been neo, strategy, which was strongly science-based, so there's other strategies, but the new strategy was really about globalization. it was really setting a framework for what outcome, both leinster to shoot goals and priorities in the sense of the people who put this together on the site thinks he will be in a safer a safer world. the adoption of the framework for action ha
. he holds a jd and a ph.d inñs political science from thisvç institution, an m.a. from hebrew university of jerusalem, and a ba in english literature from swarthmore college. norman podhoretz -- i feel silly introducing these people -- norman podhoretz served as editor-in-chief of "commentary" magazine from 1960-1995, and is their current editor at large. he was awarded the presidential medal of freedom by george w. bush. he served as a senior fellow at the hudson institute and was a senior fellow, and he's the author of many books, and articles including the bush doctrine, what the president said and what it means, world war for. and why are liberal? which should have been entitled why archie is still liberal? he was a pulitzer prize call at colombia university where he urges statute of large in 1950, in the also holds a bachelors and masters degree from cambridge university england where he was a fulbright scholar and a fellow. in addition he has a bachelors degree in hebrew literature from the jewish theological seminary. alfred regnery is managing director of the a new inc
to rebuild it that way. this is the last part, from the science perspective. here's my ask. who's making the decisions about where we build, how we build? and if in a summit with the united states you're going to think it's the federal government. no. some of you might think it's the state government. not really. where do these decisions get made? local officials. whether their city or county commissions, land-use planning board. this is where the decisions are made every day wear, added up, the risk exposure occurs, but on a day-to-day translational basis you probably don't see this. but this is where decisions are made about where we build, how we build, types of building codes were going to enforce. right? yet many of these officials under tremendous pressure, particularly on the downturn that generate revenue how well the generate revenue? jobs and growth. have you ever seen anybody running for office thing i want our community to get smaller? it's always jobs and growth. that's like a mantra. that's how we go tax bases. they're having to make decisions that oftentimes our short-term
school matsh and science performance across the state increased. [applause] . i know that we have many of our state superintendents in attendance, please. if you would please rise and be recognized for t hard work that you do. [applause] these are small steps, but they're steps to buildn, and we will. wh we can never do though, is fall backwards. my pledge to parents, students and educators is to always move ahead. of coue, our efforts to improve education cannot focus only on the very young. the nevada system of higher education has been an important part of our state's success since its founding. and it has become an even more important player in our economic development efforts. i am pleased and honored to have the hancellor, both as a member of my cabinet a as an active member of the state economic development board. mr. chancellor, i know you're here. if you'd please stand. [applause] with the chancellos support, we are creating new courses of study at unr and unlv focused specifically on the sectors we are targeting for economic growth. unlv is working with my office of economic
conference on science, policy, and environment. my name is peter -- i'm the executive director of the national council on environment. it is my honor to be the master of ceremonies for much of this conference. thank you for coming. lot of people are still outside. i encourage them to come in and settle themselves down. so super hurricane sandy, the drought in the midwest, and the impact on agricultural, wild fires, the earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear reactor in japan last year, haiti earthquake, the list is long and worrying. in 2011 we had more disasters in the united states costing over a billion dollars than ever. in fact, we had even more expensive diasters but not quite as many in 2012. the drought and the super storm were hugely, hugely expensive. so disasters are happening with greater frequency, greater severity, and absolutely will much, much greater cost. we are here over the next three days to work across traditional boundaries to connect scientists of with practitioners, policy makers from the international to the local level, with conservation -- with corporations
. this is also a policy question. at that concerns me with the regime questions of a political science professor, liberal democracy and clinical science are two types. one is regime to close the type of government you have in the form goes to your regime in the form of government, both culture and the government you should be our foreign policy, keeping gadhafi empower, is that four or in opposition to american interests? i don't get them as issues' notebook. those are policy issues. i'm mainly concerned with regime issues. but you take your point, i am making a distinction between the democratic sovereignty and so i guess they don't have an objection to the overthrow of the burmese government. it would have an objection is a policy, i don't think to be a good policy to change every country in the world i am not advocating not in any sense. we can argue about different policies. i'm saying is a form of government, the liberal democratic nationstate is superior to other forms of government. one would be global governance. others isn't autocratic regime. i talk about russia and china has autocrati
and science those who have more experience and highly credentialed instructors come to do better with the mandatory courses than those who have less experience in the introductory courses. one logical interpretation is a less experienced instructors more likely to teach to the test that has impressive exam scores and happy students with the instructor evaluation. but deal crusty professors that we nearly fired one paragraph ago focus less on the exam and more on the concepts that matter most in the following courses and in life after the air force academy. we need to evaluate teachers and professors to make sure we do our right. long-term policy challenge bruited in statistics is develop a system that rewards the real value added. this is a work in progress. we'll stop there will be happy -- happy to answer any questions. thank you. [applause] >> thank you for writing this book and also "naked economics." hope it sells as well as the other statistic book. >> this is a sequel. in the sense well as with my publisher that book was published by norton and he said update this. that wa
of meteorologists who not only have great credentials but a study of science on an ongoing basis. she is a phenomenal scientist. onhak you. >> this session we really want to get you thinking. let me talk about journalists that we have today. >> okay, that's a pretty good number. we want to get everyone thinking about droughts in this discussion. you think that we can have a mega-drought? we saw how bad 2012 was in areas of the midwest and parts of the country. what about policy? do you think that we are doing enough? and what about the impact of drought on social marginalization? as we go forth, we are going to be taking some kick off questions and you will notice that there are some index cards underneath your chair. if you can periodically throughout the session, right on some of the questions that you have and some will be collecting them we will get those questions answered in a timely a fashion as possible. how are these things related to water scarcity? >> thank you very much for having us here. from the standpoint of the definitions -- [inaudible] when we speak about aridity, i
in political science the will tell you if a third party is going to be big on the national level it cannot start small. it's got to start big probably with a superstar like ronald reagan. so once he refused in early 75 to join this third party project rusher had going and wrote a book about, it was probably curtains for that particular idea. but rusher had succeeded in getting them to think more about the need to expand the republican party coming and for the republican party to be more coherent. not so is ideologically coherent it was willing to forfeit elections. i think that rusher was passed that phase of his political development or perspective by then. so he recognized that if reagan wasn't going to head it it was probably not going to get far but he stuck with that. the full details are in the book on chapter 13. but she came to see in the late 70's that it really was possible for a guy like reagan to win the republican nomination, and once he did come ever since reagan won the republican nomination 1980 and had a totally successful presidency, rusher remained to the end of his day
a student achievement, health care coverage, life science and dietetics, veteran services and energy efficiency. that's a structural deficit is gone and why we've achieved the highest credit rating in history. best buy with further to go to be sure, we have a very short recession faster than most other states and stronger than before to prepare for the future we invest in ourselves and had done so during the worst economic downturn in the big memory, lurch the, barry fermi transportation bureaucracy and shutting down the turnpike authority, controlling health care costs in introducing accountability and flexibility of our schools, ending the peace in the pension system, refer need immiscible health care, eliminating 6000 positions, and overcome its unions to gain concessions, constantly seeking better ways to deliver services. we have together saved the commonwealth over $11 billion so far, which in turn has enabled us to invest in education, innovation and infrastructure and to grow opportunity. there's always more to do. only this past week we propose to reform the retiree health b
, the regulation that you have is going to have to be based on science. that's what the law says. what science are you going to use? and her answer was, well, we'll use mostly the united nations ipcc. lot of the people don't realize that this thing was -- i wrote a whole book about this, that this all started way back 12 years ago and it was a thing by the united nations, they formed the ipcc, intergovernmental panel on climate change and they came up with all this stuff. so she said it's going to be on the ipcc. well, poetic justice couldn't have done it better if we had planned. because it was not weeks after that, it was days after that that what happened, climategate. all of a sudden they realized through some leaked information that the ipcc had been lying all those years. i'll just mention a couple things. the u. u.k. telegraph said it's the worst scientific scandal of our generation, clive cooke of the financial times says the stink of corruption is overpowering. other ipcc prominent physicist resigns because -- quote -- "climategate was a fraud on a scale i've never seen." further, thi
performance over a longer horizon. carolyn west found math and science, the students witch more experience and highly credential ed instructors in the introductory course does better in they mandatory follow-on courses than students in the introductory courses. one logical interpretation is that the less experienced instructors are more likely to teach to the test. in the introductory courses. this produces impressive exam scores and happy stunts when it comes to fill ought instructor evaluation. meanwhile, the old crusty professor,s, whom we nearly fired, focus less on the exam than on the concept which is matter most in the follow yawn courses and life after the air force academy. we need to evaluation teachers and professors, we just have to do it wrong. in the long-term policy challenge is to develop a system that rewards a teachers rival uaddded. this is a work in progress but it's not going away. so i'll stop there and be happy to answer questiones about this book. or neglect else that might be on your mine. thank you. [applause] >> i want to thank you for writing this book and also
to be a really great math and science student. i am not. but they filled me with a sense of promise, and they encouraged me to believe in myself. so many of the kids who come into covenant house don't have that, right in and you quinn to think -- you begin to think that the darkness is so large and hovers so resonantly that the light is untouchable. but the great virtue of covenant house being 40 years old and me having been a part of it for 20 years is i now know doctors and teachers and great parents who were once upon a time homeless kids. but someone inside or outside covenant house loved them. so we have to just take care of ourselves and remind ourselves that the light -- and i'm not being sentimental, i really believe this -- the light is so much stronger than the darkness. we just even have to -- we just each have to get in this together to help change the life of a kid. there are people many this city who once a week go down to that shelter and bake a birthday cake to kids who have never, ever had happy birthday sung to them before. kids who then take that down because they
and deficit reduction. he spoke at the briefing today hosted by the christian science monitor for an hour. >> thanks for coming. i'm dave cook from the monitor. welcome to the first breakfast of the new year. the guest is representative sander levin of michigan cranking member of the house ways and means committee. this is the first visit of the group. he did for deily to detroit native and the university of chicago, master's and international relations of columbia and a law degree from harvard who was elected in the michigan state senate in 1964 and served as a senate minority leader during the carter administration he was assistant administrator of the agency for international development elected to the house in 1982. for four years after his brother carl was elected to the senate. in march, 2010, representative levin one the gavel of the chairman of the ways and means committee. in the biographical portion of the program now on to the thrilling portion. as always we are on the record please, no blogging and tweeting while the breakfast is underway. there is no embargo when the breakfas
is the ranking member on house ways and means committee. is that this is sponsored by the christian science monitor. it is one hour. >> thank you for coming. i am david cote from the monitor. our guest this morning is representative sander levin of. he is a detroit native. he has a masters in international relations from harvard and was elected to the michigan state senate in 1964 and service the senate minority leader. under the current administration he was under the agency for international development and was elected to the house in 1980 to four years after his brother carl was elected to the senate. in march 2010, he won the battle of chairman of the ways and means committee. there is no embargo and breakfast is over except that c-span has agreed not to use video of the sessions session for at least two hours after the represent. to help c-span, if you happen to be sitting there microphone and you ask a question, pullet close to you. if not, they will come around you with a boom microphone. finally, if you send me a signal, i will do my best to answer questions and comments. >> thank
in math and science. teachers have more support and flexibility to respond to student's individual needs and standards and accountability are high. but achievement gaps persist. and they will until we go deeper. every educator knows that reading sufficiency by the third grade determines academics. achievement gaps begin to form in the early years. today in massachusetts only 61% of all third graders are proficient in english language arts. for african-american 38%. hispanic 38%. toddlers, ingrant -- infants, other precoolers, 30,000 of them are on the wait list for early education opportunities. let's ensure that every child in massachusetts has access to high quality early education. [applause] we know from educators, academic research and from our own experience as parents that investing in our children at the young age pays huge dividends for them and for our community as a whole. let once again fund k-12 education higher than we did last year. our lead in education is too important to lose. our competitors state, competitor countries are not slowing down. neither should we. and as we
science research has shown, which sort of complicates this a little bitting are is that violent video games and movies have a counteracting effect, which is to incapacitate people. when violent movies come out, crime rate goes down because everybody is spending high-risk evening times in the move the theater. the same thing for video games. the incapacitation effect outweighs -- >> we need to have one coming out every day. >> what we don't know is whether you make the games and the movies a little less violent, whether people will spend less time engaging. it's a little complicated on the violence side. >> in fairness in the columbine case, there was a rush to judgment about the impact of violence video games on the young shooters, and then more detailed studies what drove them, one of them was more psycho pathic than people knew at the time and he drove the other shooter to become part of what turned out to be his lethal posse. so the larger issue, it seems to me, is taking all the component parts of violence in the media, a country that has had a lot of violence in its borders, in t
, you'll get penicillin, penicillin is the key for everyone. science is on bioengineered drugs, et cetera, where, in fact, in the future we will each get a unique drug that is bioengineered for us. how on earth does that old regulatory system move to accommodate the new one? this is extremely difficult and, of course, they are bound by the systems, right, they are bound by their history, as we all are, and this is becoming extreme difficult. in area after area, and, of course, this is, particularly the cutting edge innovative businesses that constantly get frustrated. we can grow, we can get so much bigger, we can bring in so much more money, we could create 74 jobs. and yet, there's a regulatory apparatus is simply not done to deal with the rate of technological change of the 21st century. so i think that would be the second way we could improve performance. the third way would be to take performance seriously. as i say, we have, the government is now up to its ears in performance methods. when i was having to be an advocate for the 20 years ago there was a brand-new idea. i said
political science expert and has done a lot of understanding in terms of venezuela specifically. you know, one of the things we say often in politics, you can't beat something with nothing, right? and so the opposition may have problems with the way things are going forward, but what is the realistic alternative that they have in the current environment and to the extent that they really want to contest this, what can they do to move forward? >> well, first, let me echo what charles said. it is somewhat intimidating to be in the room with a lot of you who know and follow venezuela a lot more closely than i do. so i'm going to quote someone who actually knows venezuela as i do, and that's my 8-year-old son. [laughter] he's been, oddly -- because i've been called at all hours of the day and night checking my equal and computer constantly, he's been very obsessed with the health of chavez. the other day, actually on the 10th in the morning, he says how's that president anyway? i said, well, he's still sick, but he's going to be sworn in absentia as president. and he says why don't they just
and also to get a sense for whether interventions have worked. the national academy of science firearms looked at the data and a set of long as you use it with the appropriate care, acknowledge its limits, and on deily use the data that has been generated from the jurisdictions that are comprehensively tracing all of the firearms so you have a reasonable sample of gone stark recovered from the streets in the crime that you can use that data to do some generalizations. as both jon and daniel have discussed new guns are disproportionately recovered in crime. this is an important indicator that you have a flow of guns going from the legal commerce into the hands of criminals and many of these guns when you look at who the first purchaser wasn't revealed that possessor was coming you have a change of hand suggesting that not only is it moving quickly from the dealer onto the streets and it's the recovery of law enforcement and crime but also changing hands very rapidly as well. beyond the sales volume as he was suggesting some licensed dealers are disproportionately frequent sources of fire
that klaus made, the national academy of sciences shortly will be issuing a report on the nation's energy work force, and the seven or eight sectors across energy are experiencing much higher levels of retirement, much greater shortages in exactly the same skill sets that we found in the entry-level jobs and early jobs in manufacturing. so that competition across sectors for a minimal pool is only going to increase, putting more of a burden on your efforts in the region. but i think it's important to see how this is a growing problem. >> right. >> i was just going to say two quick this things. one is this big data idea that the mayor mentioned and you mentioned, and i think that's where we should just leverage that. that's the capability we have to talk about where these job needs are. we talked about the machinists, right? that is an aging talent, really vital talent pool. so i think getting more transparency because students just -- we aren't aware of what these opportunities are, and we can get that quickly. i really think that's a key element. the second related to that, you mentioned
. studying in science and technology to the second question from the audience, does the debt ceiling still have a practical purpose? could be eliminated without much consequence of? >> does what? >> the debt ceiling. >> no, it doesn't really have -- it's got symbolic value i guess, but no other country i believe, maybe one or two of the countries but i think essentially no other countries in the world have this particular institution. just so everybody understands what it is, the congress appropriates $100, tells the government to spend $100 on whatever, and then it raises $80 in revenue through its tax code. now, there is arithmetic here. so says you've got to borrow $20, right? no. the congress has to give a third row which has 100 minus 80 equals 20. there really is, if the congress is approving spending and its approving taxing, and those two things are not equal, then this kind of logically, there's got to be something to make up the difference and that difference is borrowing. i'm not saying that deficits and debt are a good thing or a blessing that at all but the way to address it i
or not facilitating what it was intended to do. >> in the debt bomb you have duplication and federal programs. science, technology, engineering, mathematics education programs. 209 of those. surface transportation, 100 plus. picture quality, 82 programs. economic development 88. transportation assistance, 80 financial literacy among 56 different programs, job training forty-seven different job training programs. homelessness and the prevention, assistance, plenty programs. food for the hundred and 18. disaster response prepared this cannot be met, 17 different programs. >> well, it is not just a land is that we have that many programs. what is also outlandish as we don't know if they're working because when they are passed there is nothing that says you have to have a metric to see if it is accomplishing the goal. in the base defect of the congress since i have been here has been the total lack of oversight of most of the programs. >> you recount in the book a story about taking an amendment to the senate floor to get rid of some of these duplication programs, duplicative programs. what happened? why
suggested they put a green card to the diplomas of seniors getting advanced degrees in science and technology and engineering and math. we need to expand the program, and at the same time, we need effective visa programs and on skilled seasonal workers as well. number five, immigration reform must include an effective and efficient verification system. such a system can and must prevent unlawful employment and one of those employers and employees play by the rules and protect america's fundamental rights and we must protect our border through smart enforcement. now, according to the migration policy institute, immigration enforcement takes share of federal law enforcement spending. today it did not undocumented migration is at or below zero. but we must realize that we will not meet our immigration challenge through the enforcement alone. the goal of our immigration enforcement policy should be to remove real threats to our borders and inside our country. we should report serious offenders and we should not deport people who have a lack of papers is there serious crime. we wrot
for a graduate certificate in science and technology. second question from the audience, does the debt ceiling of a practical purpose? could it be eliminated without much consequence? >> does what have? >> the debt ceiling. >> it does not really have. it has symbolic value i guess, but no other country, i believe, maybe one or two other, but no other countries in the world have this particular institution . to so everyone understands what is, the congress appropriates $100, tells the government to spend $100 on whenever and then it raises $80 in revenue through its tax code. now, the arithmetic here sort of says, you have to borrow $20. shephard -- the congress has to give a third rule. if the congress is approving spending and taxing and those two things are not equal then this kind of logically, there must be something to make up the difference which is borrowing. i am not sink's deficits and debts are a good thing, but the way to address this is by having a sensible plan for spending and a sensible plan for revenue. and make decisions about how big government should be or how small it shoul
for command and control. this is the art of military science now. so if you start to pull at that thread, the second, third and fourth order of effects is awfully important, i think, to all of us. so i think it's important to the nation to consider ramifications of looking to someone else to make those decisions. thank you. >> if i might, sir -- >> go ahead. >> i'd like to address one piece of commissioner yaki's remarks, sir, that you referred to us as i independent silos, and i can see how it might appear that way. we are different services, we're structured differently, our service cultures are somewhat different, but believe you me, my peers on the possible here, we work well and cooperatively together. our trial counsel and defense counsel assistance programs leverage each other's experience. our judges train together. we take the best practices that we each identify in our services and try to figure out how best to apply them within the challenges that we face -- not necessarily uniquely, but perhaps differently. so it may not appear that we are acting in a coordinated way, but i c
. congressman levin is the ranking member of the house ways and means committee. his comments by the science monitor is about an hour. >> thanks for coming. i'm dave cook from the monitor. i guess this morning's representatives sander levin of the house ways and means committee. since his first visit of a welcome. he's a detroit native, earned dispatchers at the university of chicago, masters from columbia and a law degree from harvard. he was elected a state senate in 1964 and served as senate minority leader during the carter administration was assistant administrator of the agent t. for international development. he was selected the house in 1982 for your sectors rather was elected to the senate in march 2010 representative of an unaccountable as chairman of the ways and means committee, this end of the biographical bowl portion coming onto the the thrilling process portion. as always, we are unaffected. no live blogging in treating her embargo in the breakfast is over except c-span has agreed not to use video for at least two hours after the breakfast and pizza helped c-span if you set y
higher homicide rates typically buy guns until my people? as they understand the social science research, it's never been definitively established. we have particularly in the south, a general sense people are responsible for their own self protection they need weaponry and also a higher prevalence rate in the south. it's hard to distinguish what causes that situation. >> we can't isolate. it's the first time for the research to violent crime goes down. minicity video. i've never heard that. to isolate this is wrong. one thing is pretty 94 crime bill community thirty-year crinkling up late james wilson a sociologist at bay are going to have to get used to this. that policy begins to decline in crime this was violence have a comprehensive approach that more police on the street doing community policing from getting guns off the street the assault weapons ban. it has a three strikes you're out, what is rated at that point, the basically considered afterschool program is the midnight basketball. but it had a comprehensive approach for all types of crimes federal crimes. when we talk about
? and that's what, as i understand the social science research, it's never been definitively established. b um, we have particularly in the south a general sense that people are responsible for their own self-protection and that they need weaponry to do it, and there is also a higher murder rate, high or violence rate in the south. it's very hard to distinguish what causes what in that situation. >> can i -- we're trying to, we can't isolate. i would argue that, well, i mean, that's the first time i've heard this research that somehow violent crime goes down when a violent video -- i've never heard that or seen that taken, but that said, to try to isolate this, i think, is slightly wrong. let me say one thing, and that is pre-'94 crime bill you had a 30-year run of crime going up and violence going up. james q. wilson, the sociologist, would say we're just going to have to get used to this fact. that policy passed in '94 which began the decline both in crime as well as violence. had a comprehensive approach about more police on the street doing community policing, getting guns off the stree
for the command and control. this is the art of military science now so we start to pull at that thread. second, third, fourth quarter of an important to all the fuss. so i think it's important to the nation to consider ramifications of looking to someone else to make those. >> thank you. >> i would like to address one piece in the remarks that you refer to as an independent silo and i can see how it might appear that way. we are different services structured differently. reservists cultures are different. but believe you me, my peers on the panel work well and cooperatively together we leverage each other's experience and the judges train together. we take the best practices in our services and try to figure out how best to apply them within the challenges that we face differently so it may not appear that we are acting in a coordinated way but i can assure you that we are particularly when it comes to the challenges of the complex litigation and the prevention and response efforts. there are also in the essential very much the same with their emphasis on prevention. once they get to us, we'll
, it is not an exact science, but the exact anonymity. it is a fair fight. >> at the meeting that we had in cairo yen one of the leaders of the syrian opposition spoke with immense and compelling pride about syria's tradition as a country the was open to varying faiths. i saw that first and myself from an earlier trip. went to the jewish temple in damascus. and he described his country as a garden of flowers with different representations from different religions and all valued together. so against that contract they are suspicious of, unhappy with the edgy hottest sentiment behind other groups. at the same time when you are fighting for your life, when your family members are being massacred and tortured, when your children are being torn apart and bomb explosions, the people who are fighting beside you require legitimacy. and it is important that we be involved enough to not only offset but overwhelmed that legitimacy that the extremist groups are obtaining. if we think back to our own history, 225 years ago we were country with an internal war for independence to drive
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